Catchy phrases dating headlines

“Not only is there no intelligent connection between the word “presser” and its supposed meaning, this word already has a definition: a person or device that removes wrinkles. “Less than a week into the new year and it’s the most overused, meaningless word in the media,” said Ross. “Because I am tired of hearing swag to describe anything on the face of the planet.Let’s either say ‘press conference’ or ‘press release’ or come up with something more original, intelligent and interesting! “This industry buzzword has slipped into usage in news reporting and now that they have started, they can’t seem to stop using it.” – Richard W. “Men don’t need another disgusting-sounding word thrown into the vocabulary to describe something they do…You’re just taking too much room on this train seat, be a little more polite…” – Carrie Hansen, Caledonia, Mich. Stop calling your boyfriend ‘bae’.” — Evie Dunagan, Manheim, Penn. I heard someone refer to their ramen noodles as ‘bae’! “The most annoying term of affection to show up in years. “A dumb, annoying word.” — James Becker, Holly, Mich. Priddy noted that it quickly jumped from the weather forecast to other areas, as he said he knew it would: “Today’s St. “I just received an e-mail for a book called ‘Marriage Hacks.’ I have seen articles about life hacks, home improvement hacks, car hacks, furniture hacks, painting hacks, work hacks and pretty much any other hack you can think of. Phrases such as ‘I have the skill set to do that properly’ or anything resembling that phrase, shows the speaker is seriously lacking skills in the art of conversation. By the way, your website is so ‘swag.'” – Alex, Roanoke, Va. Do we call people who like wine ‘winies’ or beer lovers ‘beeries’? “‘Someone who enjoys food’ applies to everyone on Earth. ‘Oh, I’m an airie; I just love to breathe.’ ‘Could we do it at 11, instead?

catchy phrases dating headlines-56

1171, which says, “Although the ‘price point’ of effective new drugs…may initially be out of reach for many patients…” “It has no ‘point.’ It is just a ‘price.’” – Guy Michael, Cherry Hill, N. “Usually used in a sentence explaining the ‘secret’ in excruciating public detail. “Whether it’s a ‘free gift’ (banished in 1988) or droopy clothing, this word is neither useful nor fancy.” – Jeff Drake, Saint Albans, West Va.

Is this a metaphor for business success based on the fast food industry? “It has become too frequent in business discussions. “An annoying bit of hyperbole about the latest saucy picture or controversy that is already becoming trite.” – Tim Bednall, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia “Meaning a post or video or whatever will have so much Internet traffic that it will ‘break the internet.’ It’s being used for every headline and video. “I hope the list doesn’t ‘break the internet.’ (How else would I read it next year)? “It seems as if every politician who makes a statement has to ‘walk it back,’ meaning retract the statement, or explain it in laborious detail to the extent that the statement no longer has any validity or meaning once it has been ‘walked back.’” – Max Hill, Killeen, Tex. Kenneth Ross of Glastonbury, Conn., and Bob Priddy of Jefferson City, Mo., were among many who saw this storming in last January. “The word has become so overused that it is not ‘swag’ to not use the word ‘swag.'” – Devin, Farwell, Mich.

Post-Truth – To paraphrase the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, we are entitled to our own opinions but not to our own facts. What’s considered as such is best left to historians rather than the contemporary media. Golf greens are the closest grass comes to being manicured. Needs to return to its genesis: perfectly groomed eyebrows. Ghost – To abruptly end communication, especially on social media.

Guesstimate – When : 8 letters, 3 words, 1 meaning. Bigly – Did the candidate say “big league” or utter this 19th-Century word that means, ? Is it rejection angst, or is this word really as overused as word-banishment nominators contend? Dadbod – The flabby opposite of a chiseled-body male ideal. ” – The Committee is not sure why this malapropism got nominators’ dander up in 2016.

“The term itself is stupid, and the campaign and petition written by men’s rights activists claiming that men need to take up more space due to their anatomy, and that anti-manspreading campaigns are ‘male-bashing,’ are ridiculous. If I was putting someone ‘before anything else,’ I would respect them enough to use their name.” — S. Also, the concept ‘before anybody else,’ developed AFTER the word became popular. “I’d rather be called ‘babe’ than ‘bae’ any day.” — Alexsis Outwater, Bronson, Mich. — Dawn Farrell, Kanata, Ont., Canada “Enough with the over-sensationalized words to describe weather! Prescott, Oshawa, Ont., Canada “I think most, if not all can agree that we would prefer to avoid the polar vortex in the future, both in name and in embodiment.” — Christine Brace, Westminster, Md. Louis Post-Dispatch editorializes about a ‘political vortex.'” “Suddenly things that once would have been called ‘tips’ are now being called ‘hacks.’ It can’t be because the one word is shorter or easier to say; and the actual accepted meanings of ‘hack’ have nothing to do with suggestions for doing tasks better or more efficiently — quite the opposite, really.” – Sharla Hulsey, Sac City, Iowa. What they really mean is ‘tip’ or ‘short cut,’ but clearly it is not a ‘hack,’ as it involves no legal or ethical impropriety or breach of security.” – Peter P. There are probably even hacking hacks.” – Chellsea Mastroine, Canton, Ohio. We already have a perfectly good word in ‘skills’ (ending with an s, not a z).” – Chip Lupo, Columbia, S. I’m kind of a sleepie.'” – Andy Poe, Marquette, Mich.

The problem is with people taking up too much space on the subway or any public mode of transportation. “Life hack, this hack, that hack…stop with the hacks! “I crave good sleep, too, but that does not make me a sleepie. Sounds like ‘foodie’ is a synonym for ‘everybody.’ Foodies around the world agree; let’s banish this term.” – Steve Szilagyi, Mason, Mich.

The song, It's My Life (What Ever I Wanna Do), is a fairly catchy piece of Auto-Tune pop, in the style of early Lil Wayne, which Mr Mallesh, 29, describes as 'a non-fictional, psychological and philosophical song written by me’.

But having racked up in excess of 4.2million views, Mr Mallesh is probably laughing along with his critics - and all the way to the bank.

“A pretentious way of saying ‘selected.’ It’s enormously overused.” – Kristi Hoerauf, San Francisco, Calif. K., ‘takeaway’ food is known as ‘to go’ here in the Colonies. “Purely with reference to a specific teams’ fans, this word needs to go. “Let’s just keep with ‘shake yer booty’ — no need to ‘twerk’ it! “Come on down, we’re havin’ car-ageddon, wine-ageddon, budget-ageddon, a sale-ageddon, flower-ageddon, and so-on-and-so-forth-ageddon!

Tags: , ,