www life dating com - Explain the process of thermoluminescence dating

When a small sample of ancient pottery is heated it glows with a faint blue light, known as thermoluminescence or TL.

explain the process of thermoluminescence dating-87

The accumulation of trapped electrons, and the gaps left behind in the spaces they vacated, occurs at a measurable rate proportional to the radiation received from a specimen’s immediate environment.

When a specimen is reheated, the trapped energy is released in the form of light (thermoluminescence) as the electrons escape.

A non-negligible part of materials which ceramic is usually made of (like quartz and feldspars) is thermoluminescent: those materials have trap states that can capture electrons after interaction with alfa, beta and gamma rays existing in nature.

When these materials are heated to several hundreds of Centigrade degrees, electrons are evicted from trap states and energy is emitted in form of light: thermoluminescence (TL).

The wavelength of the emitted light is characteristic of the luminescent substance and not of the incident radiation.

Thermoluminescence (TL) is the process in which a mineral emits light while it is being heated: it is a stimulated emission process occurring when the thermally excited emission of light follows the previous absorption of energy from radiation.

Sample discs are mounted on a wheel and the readers are programmed to run heating and irradiation sequences.

The TL is measured using a sensitive detector called a photomultiplier tube.

curve is from the applied laboratory dose For the genuine vase, the archaeological signal(s) are well above the background and close to the signal from the applied laboratory dose.

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