Errors in radiometric dating

Theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss (emphasis on the theoretical) told RSR that 14c in allegedly million-year-old specimens is an "anomaly." However, an anomaly is something that deviates from what is standard, normal, or expected.Because modern carbon exists in significant quantities, far above the reliability threshold of the AMS labs doing the tests, these results can : Unexpected C14 is found in specimens worldwide, yet 14c production (in the ground as compared to in the atmosphere) requires a lot of nearby radioactivity to produce appreciable amounts of 14c by neutron capture.

errors in radiometric dating-70errors in radiometric dating-82errors in radiometric dating-22

It can be used to date stone tools, pottery fragments, and other artifacts.

In Europe, it has been used frequently to reconstruct the chronological sequence of graves in a cemetery (e.g.

(2) There's mostly left-handed amino acids (not yet decayed to a 50/50 right-to-left ratio) in chert and dinosaur eggshells.

(3) There's flexible and even transparent blood vessels, cells, and even and hadrosaur DNA (with a half-life of ~521 years) in dinosaur soft tissue fossils.

Jørgensen 1992; Two different variants of seriation have been applied: contextual seriation and frequency seriation (Renfrew and Bahn 1996, pp. Whereas contextual seriation is based on the presence or absence of a design style, frequency seriation relies on measuring the proportional abundance or frequency of a design style.

Contextual seriation is often used for reconstructing the chronological sequence of graves as only the presence or absence of a design style or type is important.

Of course we're hoping that now that we've corrected the material below, that this is solid A work!

* Since Carbon-14 is EVERYWHERE It Can't Be an Anomaly: Carbon 14 doesn't lie. Unless from a secondary source, like contamination or neutron capture (described below), anything millions of years old should have NO Carbon-14.

Also, : In a meeting with RSR, a geologist with a degree from Colorado's School of Mines who has a background in nuclear physics (who also spent years bombarding various elements with neutrons to make isotopes for industry) told RSR that Carbon does not easily absorb neutrons because it is the heavier elements beginning with Sodium that readily capture neutrons.

Further, while it is relatively unlikely that a Carbon atom will capture a free neutron, industrial processes use Carbon neutrons, whereas they use heavier elements, typically starting with Silicon, which is almost double the atomic weight of Carbon, for neutron capture.

And consider this from a peer-reviewed paper in a respected scientific journal, "at a constant 10°C (the approximate mean annual air temperature in Britain today) it will take between 0.2 and 0.7 Ma for levels of collagen to fall to 1% of their original concentration in an optimal burial environment." * Getting Graded: An expert on radiocarbon dating, long-time assistant professor at Loma Linda University, Dr. The teacher corrected a couple points and clarified a few others.

Tags: , ,