accomodating vs stubborn personality - Social psychology research dating violence

The researchers defined “violence” broadly: it could include psychological or emotional abuse as well as physical or sexual abuse.

social psychology research dating violence-53social psychology research dating violence-5social psychology research dating violence-90

In 2013, President Obama declared February National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month.

According to the National Research Center on Domestic Violence, approximately 1.5 million high school students every year experience physical abuse from a dating partner.

The data did not specifically address why many of the negative outcomes were different for boys and girls, or explain the conditions that led to revictimization, says Deinera Exner-Cortens, lead author of the study and a doctoral candidate in developmental psychology at Cornell University."We know that girls are more likely to experience more severe physical violence, sexual violence and injury, and they report more fear around their aggressive dating experiences," she says.

"We need more research to better understand how aggression functions in teen dating relationships."Healthy romantic relationships "are a very important developmental experience for teens," she adds.

For all the recent hand-wringing over “cyberbullying” in schools, an older and more insidious type of bullying unfortunately remains, according to a new study: teen dating abuse.

About one third of youths (ages 14 to 20) in the study said that they have been the victims of dating violence.Dating violence that emerges in the high school years, as teens start to evaluate their romantic and sexual identities, is foreshadowed by bullying behaviors in middle school when kids are testing out how they will identify themselves among peers and social groups.That bullying behavior, too, is often foreshadowed by experiences within the context of their families: early exposure to abuse, aggression, or violence among family members can have a significant impact on kids’ behavior as they explore new types of relationships.Rates generally increased with age but were similar across race, ethnicity and income levels, according to Ybarra.These findings were presented on Wednesday at a symposium on teen dating violence at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.Victims of teen dating violence are at increased risk of mood and behavior problems as young adults, and at increased risk for future violent relationships, a new study suggests.

Tags: , ,